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Q. I'm 53, my husband is 64, and we both work. We have savings and a portfolio that's managed by a large brokerage firm. Both our names are on all accounts but we don't have wills. My lawyer friend tells me we must have wills. She offered to write them for no charge but my husband is dragging his feet. For a year he has said he's too busy. He claims the same law firm that works with our financial adviser must write them. He also says it's taking him this long to get things ready for that lawyer. I'm familiar with that law firm and our financial advisor, but. I'm worried about what will happen if he dies before this is done. I need to be able to get our money to pay our daughter's college bills. What can I do?

Ans.  There's no reason for you to wait a year for your husband to take action. You are a grownup. You own half that property. You should make sure it is properly protected. Have your lawyer friend make a simple will for each of you now, declaring that everything you own goes directly to the other and/or your heirs. That should cover immediate emergencies. Then contact that financial advisor and make sure he's ready to deal with that law firm. Next call the firm and ask to speak to the attorney your husband contacted. If he hasn't really done so, you do it, and, if that attorney so advises, have a trust and living wills set up to cover your complete estate for both you and your husband to sign. It's not rocket science.

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