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50 Top Anxiety Producers

-Everyone is more nervous about his or her job than ever before because of the uncertain economy.

In fact, some experts estimate American workers are 30% more stressed than they were one year ago. Of those surveyed, say those experts, 28% expect to have even higher stress levels a year from now.

So what's going on? Even if the country is slowly recovering, most offices are operating with less staff, more pressure, and more pressing deadlines. There's no way to stay calm in that atmosphere, according to Johathan Berent and Amy Lemley, co-authors of "Work Makes Me Nervous: Overcome Anxiety and Build the Confidence to Succeed."

What you probably don't realize, they say, is that workplace anxiety is an actual condition with REAL physical and mental effects (heart disease, hyperthyroidism, and obesity among others).

While Lemley actually suffered from social and workplace anxiety-and denied it for some time- Jonathan Berent worked as a psychotherapist specializing in workplace anxiety more than 30 years.

Their research uncovered more than 50 "anxiety triggers" in the workplace and when they hear about them, most people are surprised at how many they personally experienced. They include speaking up during meetings, answering the phone when you don't know who's calling, learning new skills, and having to introduce a guest speaker. Others include making presentations, giving speeches in front of strangers, and even giving speeches before audiences that include people you know. Being interviewed for a job is another, as are making follow-up phone calls about a job interview and-any technology! 

And here are the rest of them:

Anxiety Causes Sidebar: :
 
Other Common Workplace Anxiety Triggers:
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Making small talk
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When my boss asks to meet with me
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 Having to talk during a conference call
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 Being seen on a webcam
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 Knowing I'm going to miss a deadline and not saying anything
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. Using a microphone
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Meeting with people outside my division
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When other people get credit for my work
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Attending company social events
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Traveling with colleagues
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 Forgetting something
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Asking a question
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When someone asks me a question
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Making an appointment and then realizing I am double-booked
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Interacting with colleagues of the opposite sex
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Doing team projects
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Giving feedback to my employees
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Asking for help within earshot of my supervisor
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Seeing people who know I interviewed for a job I didn't get
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 Arriving late
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 Being dressed too casually or too formally
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That my co-workers will find out I'm gay
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Covering the receptionist's duties during lunch break

Team-building exercises

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Passing the company president in the hallway
 Introducing myself
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When something happens that makes me think my talents aren't valued
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When I fail to meet a project goal
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Remembering people's names
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People I don't like but have to ask for something
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 Eating with my colleagues-I'm afraid I'll look like a slob
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 When colleagues discuss personal subjects such as religion or politics
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Writing-e-mails, memos, reports, anything!
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Using the public restroom when others are in there
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 Delegating tasks to other people
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Being singled out in a crowd
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 Suggesting a solution and having someone explain why it's wrong
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 Being in situations where I have to sign my name or write anything in front of people
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 Being attracted to a fellow employee
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 Giving my opinion without knowing what other people think

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Job Hunting During Holiday Season

You Can't 'Fix' Co-Workers