Ask Dr. Job’s chief contributor, Sandra Pesmen, is a member of the Chicago Journalism Hall of Fame and author of “DR. JOB’s Complete Career Guide.”

Winner of several journalism awards, Pesmen is a graduate of the University of Illinois Media College at Urbana, and is listed in several Who’s Who editions. She also has been Corporate Features Editor of Crain Communications Inc., founding Features Editor of Crain’s Chicago Business and a reporter/features writer for The Chicago Daily News.

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Think Like The Rich to Find Job

 

F. Scott Fitzgerald observed "The rich are different from you and me," and one reason may be that they don't have to search for work in tough job markets.

Yet some of the rich people's characteristics can serve you well during your job hunt, and Steve Siebold, author of "How Rich People Think," (Paperback, $16.99) tells you how to adapt them.

He calls his method  "5 Steps to Landing a Job Through Rich Thinking." And he guarantees this method will help get any job seeker's foot in the door!

 It goes like this: 
 
1.    Approach small and medium size businesses and offer to sell their products/services on 100% commission.
 
2.    Volunteer to work for a local business for FREE for 2 weeks as a trial. Outwork everyone in the place and ask him or her to hire you.
 
3.    Contact local dentists, doctors, accountants, lawyers, chiropractors and offer to help them bring in new clients and patients by booking them to deliver presentations to local businesses and community organizations.
 
4.    Offer to conduct customer service surveys for local restaurants and collect leads for new customers.
 
5. Call the managers of clubs that require membership (country club, men's club, women's club, tennis club, chambers of commerce, civic clubs, etc.) and offer to call the members and thank them for their membership and possibly sell them an upgraded membership.

It can't hurt to try. ###
 

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